Anti Aging Skin Care Regimen

Let us take a look at anti aging skincare routine

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Anti Aging Skin Care Regimen

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Know about Skin and Skin Care

Vitamin D and Skin Care

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

4 min read

Vitamin D and Skin Care

VITAMIN D AND SKIN


A fat-soluble vitamin that is essential to human physiology is vitamin D. Globally, vitamin D insufficiency is common. Aside from the well-known skeletal problems, this shortage has numerous undiscovered implications. Our goal in doing this study is to provide an overview of the body of research on vitamin D status in India and to gauge the scope of the issue. Between 40% and 99% of people have vitamin D deficiency; most studies found that between 80% and 90% of people had the condition. It was common in high-risk groups as well as all age groups. We can envision the burden that a vitamin D deficiency would bring to our nation, given the research being done on the effects of it on autoimmune illnesses, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and tuberculosis.


SOURCES OF VITAMIN D


The primary source of vitamin D is the ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation that is naturally produced in skin when exposed to sunshine. This radiation has a wavelength of 290–320 nm. The primary dietary sources include supplements, fortified foods, and seafood. Grains and vegetables are inadequate supplies.
Melanin pigmentation, solar zenith angle, latitude, atmospheric pollution, and ozone layer all influence the skin's ability to synthesize vitamins when exposed to ultraviolet B radiation.
Vitamin D Status in Relation to 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels
Serum 25(OH) D levels must be enough to sustain the physiologic effects on the skeletal and extraskeletal tissues. The different target organs may not all require the same threshold levels of serum 25(OH) D to maximize its effects. The US Endocrine Society classified vitamin D deficiency as having a blood 25(OH) D level of less than 20 ng/mL, which is followed by a constant rise of parathyroid hormone and a decrease in intestinal calcium absorption.Desirable and safe range of serum 25(OH) D level would be 30–100 ng/mL as at serum 25(OH) D levels of 30 ng/mL intestinal calcium absorption reaches its peak, and PTH levels continue to fall until this level of 25(OH) D is attained.


Magnitude of Vitamin D Deficiency in India

The prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency is reported worldwide, both in sunshine deficient and sunshine sufficient countries. Still, it is the most underdiagnosed and undertreated nutritional deficiency in the world. However, various studies showed poor Vitamin D status irrespective of age, sex, and geography. As there is no standard guideline which is followed all over the world for classifying the Vitamin D status, these studies had different cutoff values for the deficiency. The vast majority of these studies used serum 25(OH) D level of <20 ng/ml as Vitamin D deficiency.


CAUSES OF VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY


The data above make it clear that vitamin D insufficiency is very common in India. In addition to inadequate dietary intake, vitamin D deficiency is also seen in patients with liver, renal, and skin conditions. There are numerous explanations for why it is so widespread in our nation.
● Increased indoor use, which makes it more difficult to receive enough sunlight. Because of industrialization, this is mostly seen in the urban population.
● UV rays from pollution can prevent the skin from synthesizing vitamin D.
● Low intake of calcium and vitamin D in the diet is a result of changing eating habits.
● Diets high in fiber can contain phytates and phosphates, which can deplete vitamin D
reserves and increase the need for calcium.


THE WAY FORWARD


Even while we know what causes vitamin D insufficiency, there isn't much we can do to prevent it. India receives plenty of sunshine because it is a tropical nation. Since the majority of Indians reside in regions with year-round access to sunlight, it is assumed that they have enough vitamin D. In India, on the other hand, vitamin D insufficiency is very common.
The majority of Indians are vegetarians, therefore foods high in vitamin D are derived from animals. The urban population can be caused by any of the aforementioned variables. But even those living in rural areas, who receive enough solar exposure from their jobs, also have low levels of Vitamin D. Their diet, which is low in calcium and heavy in phytate, may be the cause of this. It is well known that a diet high in phytate inhibits the intestinal absorption of calcium. Therefore, inadequate calcium in the diet causes an increase in the breakdown of 25(OH)D and an increase in inactive metabolites, which lowers the concentrations of 25(OH)D.

The easiest way to deal with this problem is to fortify food with vitamin D. Milk of any grade can be fortified. Vitamin D can be added to oil and milk products, including butter, yogurt, curd, and baby formulae. It is also possible to fortify commonly consumed foods like rice flour, atta, and maida. Food products fortified with vitamin D ought to be included in the public distribution system and offered to the general public for a reasonable price. To guarantee this, effective legislation is needed. A fortification program cannot be developed without the ongoing will and assistance of the political and administrative establishment.
In India, each 100 grams of vanaspati (dalda) is supplemented with 200 IU of vitamin D. Certain brands of milk products additionally contain vitamin D fortification.
Since vitamin D insufficiency is the most underdiagnosed and undertreated nutritional illness, educational initiatives are essential to raising public knowledge of the condition. It is important to inform the public and physicians about its ramifications. A sufficient amount of time, money, and effort must be invested in order to design, implement, and maintain such a program. High-quality vitamin D supplements should be made available at the PHC level for the population at risk, which includes children, elderly people, pregnant and lactating women, and nursing mothers.
The ICMR's Vitamin D RDA has to be revised because it is lower than other recommendations. Children attending school can gain from the following: teaching them the importance of having enough vitamin D and leading a healthy lifestyle; offering foods enriched with vitamin D during midday meals in schools; and engaging in regular physical activity that guarantees exposure to sunlight.
Since mass screening is impractical, testing facilities for vitamin D levels should be made reasonably priced and available to individuals who are most at risk of developing a clinical vitamin D deficiency (pregnant women, children, and the elderly, especially women).
Research teams studying and tracking the effects of fortification techniques and supplementation programs should be assisted by the government.


Use of Silymarin for Skincare

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Use of  Silymarin for Skincare

There’s an ingredient that's probably not quite on your skincare radar yet - but we think it’s worth considering.

The ingredient is called Silymarin (sih-lee-mae-rin), and comes from the extract of milk thistle. You'll find it on the ingredient list as "Silybum Marianum Fruit Extract",

Silymarin is a potent antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties. And wait! We know what you’re thinking – “hmm…that sounds like just about every other ‘skincare miracle; plant extract that’s out there”. But unlike thousands of touted plant extract elixirs, silymarin actually has tested topical benefits. In fact, silymarin has great data behind tackling hyperpigmentation and even some early data on acne help.So the fact that silymarin has been tested topically and benched against existing skincare powerhouse actives such as hydroquinone makes our chemist senses tingle.

Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) has been used as traditional medicine for centuries across various cultures from the Greek to the Chinese. In traditional medicine, it has been used for a wide range of ailments… from liver diseases, gallbladder issues “melancholy”.

You might be wondering… given how amazing silymarin sounds, why don’t we see it in more products? Sadly, like many lovely antioxidants, silymarin is actually REALLY unstable


Role of Collagen in Skincare

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Role of Collagen in Skincare

As we age, it naturally degrades in our skin. Our goal at all times is to keep our skin as healthy and happy as possible, and looking after our collagen is all part of that.

Collagen is a protein. It is the most plentiful protein in the human body. We might think about collagen almost solely in association with our skin, but it does a lot of very important work in ‘glueing’ several of the different internal parts of your body together, like muscles, ligaments, tendons, and bones, as well as being very important when it comes to helping your blood to clot correctly.

In skin, collagen helps to form a network of cells called fibroblasts, which helps new cells to grow. It also plays a role in replacing and restoring dead skin cells. As we age, the collagen in our skin degrades, so skin can lose its plumpness and snap as a result. The structure of the skin can weaken, and wrinkles can begin to form.

After the menopause in women, there is a significant decline in collagen. Post 25, production of collagen also begins to slow significantly. It’s not all bad news however. There’s plenty that we can do to protect the collagen in our skin!

Collagen in skincare

When choosing skincare, you can seek products which do their bit to preserve, protect, and prompt your collagen production

Retinol

Retinol is a famous ingredient, lauded for its ability to prompt the generation of collagen in the skin

Collagen supplement

Taking a collagen supplement can be very positive for overall health, but I would emphasise that collagen supplements are not the ‘fountain of youth’ that they might be touted as. Nothing can replace a healthy lifestyle and diet.


Sheet Masks for your face

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Sheet Masks for your face

Are sheet masks supreme to the usual type of masks? Not necessarily, but they do have the added advantage of providing a cover to the product that is penetrating the skin. To make a gross but accurate analogy, think about when you keep your socks on after they've gotten wet - how long do your feet take to dry after? Absolutely ages. So, having something locking the moisture and the ingredients on to your skin lets everything soak further into the skin.

Another thing that sheet masks have on regular masks is how they force you to take about twenty minutes for you and only you. If you're a busy mammy, stick on a sheet mask and scare your minis from asking you any questions, complaining or bothering you at all.

Could you imagine trying to go about your daily chores with a wet, sticky piece of material sliding down your chin? Clearly not! If you struggle to allow yourself proper, do nothing pamper time, a sheet mask could be the answer.


Antioxidants and Our Skin

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Antioxidants and Our Skin

Without any coaxing, your skin physiologically ages. At 25, you stop producing collagen, the protein that keeps your skin plump and gives it structure (eek!), and the collagen that you have will continuously degrade as the years go on - the same goes for elastin, the protein that keeps your skin taut to your face and clinging to those contours.

Something that contributes to accelerated ageing greatly are free radicals. Be warned - these are not a rock band from the 80s. They are what cause damage to the skin through oxidation, which is when too much oxygen reaches a certain area - in this case, of the skin - resulting in damage to our skin’s DNA which has a knock on effect.

Free radicals are what are created through oxidation. To put it as simply as possible, they are a molecule with an unpaired electron, which makes them unstable. They need to be paired up so they thrash around, trying to find something to latch their unpaired electron on to. What happens is that it latches onto another healthy cell which means that the healthy cell is now unstable too.

Too many free radicals (without enough antioxidants to balance them… more on this soon) equals something known as oxidative stress. Like other stresses we know of, there is nothing fun about it, as it is what causes damage to cellular structures within the skin, including but not limited to fat cells, DNA or collagen and elastin.

Basically, antioxidants work to stabilise wily free radicals, stopping them from causing cellular devastation.

There are more antioxidants than you can shake a stick at out there but here are some of the key (particularly potent) ones that you’ll find in cleansers, serums, masques and creams:

Vitamin A

Vitamin C

Vitamin E

Green tea extract (camellia sinensis)

Coenzyme Q10 (coQ10, ubiquinone)

From the inside out

The skin is an organ and so we must feed it from within… Don’t forget that you need to get your antioxidants in through diet and/or supplements too.

Foods rich in antioxidants include:

Goji berries

Blueberries

Cherries

Tomatoes

TurmericThyme

Dark chocolate

Red wine (in the form of resveratrol - but remember that it is causing free radical damage at the same time)

One more tip… Don’t fool yourself. A serum or a masque will not be able to counteract all of the damage done if you are smoking, drinking and not getting enough sleep regularly. Take care of yourself first and foremost. Antioxidants will be your backup dancers!


Soothing the Flush: Can Skincare Beat Skin Redness?

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Soothing the Flush: Can Skincare Beat Skin Redness?

One of the budding categories in the “soothing” skincare realm is dedicated to tackling skin redness (aka. erythema)

LET’S BREAKDOWN ERYTHEMA

The most stripped-down definition of skin erythema is the temporary reddening reaction in skin that is typically caused by an external stimulus. This reaction has also been described as the result of an inflammatory response that’s associated with a skin condition such as acne, eczema, rosacea, psoriasis, etc.

Erythema is the temporary reddening of skin due to external stimuli. This phenomenon in skin can be triggered by a wide range of culprits including allergens, UV exposure, or a secondary reaction from skin conditions such as rosacea and acne.

This is all to say that erythema can be the result of many issues. From getting too much sun, the fabric your skin touches, to a more chronic skin condition

ARE THERE ANY SKINCARE INGREDIENTS THAT TACKLE REDNESS?

AZELAIC ACID

You’ll find azelaic acid in this realm because of it’s benefits in treating papulopustular rosacea (one of four categorized types of rosacea) at 15-20% concentration. Azelaic acid has also been clinically tested at that same 15% to 20% level to target acne. The takeaway here is if your skin redness isn’t caused by papulopustular rosacea or acne, this may not be the ingredient for you.

CENTELLA ASIATICA (AKA “CICA” STUFF)

Centella asiatica and its constituents (madecassoside, asiaticoside, etc.) has some research on its benefits as a wound healing ingredient. This is most likely what has given way to its potential as a soothing and erythema reducing agent.

Top Chemist Tip! If you’re wondering how to level up your skincare sleuthing skills , we recommend going to the brand’s actual product page.


THE OZEMPIC FACE!

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

THE OZEMPIC FACE!

There have been numerous news stories and articles about Ozempic recently. However, if you’ve seen social posts and videos about ‘Ozempic face,’ you may be reticent to accept a prescription for this medication if your doctor recommends it.

Ozempic face refers to facial gauntness and skin sagging that occurs due to rapid weight loss from the medication semaglutide, also known as Ozempic.

If you’ve ever heard the term ‘baby fat,’ you already have some basic knowledge about why Ozempic face happens. As infants, our faces have a lot of fat storage, and it causes babies to have smooth, round faces and plump, pinchable cheeks. As we age, this facial fat decreases. This gives teens and adults more defined facial features, but older adults in their 70s, 80s, and beyond may start to have a hollowed-out appearance to their cheeks as facial fat continues to decrease. Ozempic face occurs due to the loss of fat from the face extremely quickly related to rapid weight loss. Because we associate very hollowed-out cheeks and thin, lax skin with old age, people feel like Ozempic face makes them look older. Really, it’s just about the rapid weight loss.


Hair Loss Mythbusters

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

2 min read

Hair Loss Mythbusters

When it comes to hair health, you may have heard old beliefs such as, “Your hair will grow faster if you trim it more often.” Is there any truth behind these age-old supposed wisdoms? Follow along…

Hair myth 1: “Cutting your hair makes it grow faster” This is one of the most common hair misconceptions. While getting a haircut may make your hair look healthier by removing split ends and evening out any breakage, it actually has no impact on new hair growth or loss. Cutting your hair only affects the shaft, not the follicle, which is responsible for growth or loss.

That means you may feel free to enjoy a fresh haircut as often as you’d like, but don’t count on it to speed up growth.

Hair myth 2: “Washing your hair every day makes it fall out more” Keeping your hair clean is essential for maintaining healthy hair. It’s important to wash it regularly to remove excess oil and dirt that can clog your hair follicles, which are responsible for hair growth. If you don't shampoo regularly, sebum and hair products can build up and clog your hair follicles, which can affect the growth of your hair and cause hair thinning or hair loss. If you’re noticing loose hairs while shampooing, rest assured that it’s likely nothing to worry about. Any hair that falls out during washing was already in the shedding phase, and it likely has nothing to do with your shampooing habits.

So, don't be afraid to wash your hair on a daily basis, but be sure to use products that go easy on your scalp and hair.

Hair myth #3: “Your hair will fall out more if you brush it while it’s wet” While it’s true wet hair is more elastic and prone to breakage, it doesn't mean brushing causes hair loss. In fact, brushing can help distribute natural oils throughout your hair, which can keep it healthy and shiny. Brushing also helps remove tangles and prevents hair from becoming knotted, which can lead to breakage and hair loss. However, it is important to use a wide-toothed comb to avoid damaging wet hair and to be gentle while brushing to prevent breakage.

You don’t need to be afraid to brush your hair when it's wet. Just be gentle and use the right tools to keep your hair healthy and strong.

Hair myth #4: “Wearing a hat, or using gel, spray or mousse causes hair loss” What affects your hair shaft (the part between your hair’s root and end) doesn’t always affect your scalp. While frequently applying harsh products may damage your hair, it won’t necessarily result in hair loss. However, it’s important to note that excessive use of styling products such as sprays, gels and mousses, as well as frequent hat-wearing, can lead to a greasy scalp. This greasiness can create problems for your hair and scalp by clogging your pores and follicles.

The takeaway? Try your best to strike a balance between using hair products or wearing hair accessories and allowing your scalp to breathe.


Enhance your Hair with Vitamin E

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Enhance your Hair with Vitamin E

While vitamins and minerals are common ingredients in skin care and hair care products, vitamin E stands out as one of the most versatile and multi-beneficial
Vitamin E-infused hair care products are gaining popularity among those looking to enhance hair growth, strengthen strands and achieve unparalleled shine.

Interested in trying this hair care trend for yourself? Keep reading....
What is Vitamin E ?
Though vitamin E is often thought of as a single compound, it’s actually a group of eight fat-soluble compounds with powerful antioxidant properties. These potent antioxidants combat free radicals caused by cellular breakdown, damage and exposure to environmental aggressors.
When applied externally, vitamin E helps replenish the protective lipid layer on skin and hair strands, offering protection from damage while providing healing hydration and moisture.


Is vitamin E good for hair?
In short, yes, vitamin E provides a variety of benefits for both your hair and scalp. To start, powerful antioxidants work to alleviate scalp dryness, flaking and irritation, creating a comforted, balanced, healthy scalp. Additionally, increased blood circulation to the scalp promotes healthy hair growth while antioxidants shield existing hair follicles from damage,
reducing the risk of unwanted hair loss.


Rosacea: Skin Redness

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Rosacea: Skin Redness

The person with rosacea has redness and tiny, swollen blood vessels (called "telangiectasias") on the cheeks, nose, and chin. Sometimes, people's symptoms are under control. Other times, symptoms worsen and flare up.

There are some things that might make redness on the face worse. Examples include:

 ●Eating hot or spicy foods, or drinking hot drinks 

●Drinking alcohol 

●Being too hot or cold

 ●Sunlight

●Stress and other strong emotions Treatments do not cure rosacea, but they help control symptoms and prevent flare-ups. 

They involve:

 ●Medicines and other treatments – Medicines can come as gels, creams, or lotions that go on your skin, or as pills that you swallow. Topical medical therapies for rosacea include metronidazole, azelaic acid, brimonidine, ivermectin, sodium sulfacetamide and permethrin.  Oral medical therapies include antibiotics like tetracyclines or azithromycin, or occasionally isotretinoin (previously known as Accutane) for severe cases.

 Surgery or carefully administered lasers may also be helpful in select cases.

Lifestyle changes – To help control the symptoms and prevent flare-ups, you should inform your rosacea patients :

•Avoid things that make your symptoms worse. •Use mild, unscented face cleansers to wash your face.(ex: Bioderma sensibio cleanser)

•Wear sunscreen every day

 •Avoid using products on your face with alcohol, acid, or other ingredients that could bother your skin.


Psoriasis : A Skin Condition

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

2 min read

Psoriasis : A Skin Condition

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that affects the skin. This disease typically causes an itchy, scaly rash on the knees, elbows, trunk, and scalp. While skin is the initial organ affected, It can also be associated with Arthritis, eye inflammation, back / buttock pain, gut inflammation, nail and soft tissue pain.

Psoriasis is a common chronic disease that has no cure.

Psoriasis and Itching

Itch can be one of the most persistent and frustrating symptoms of psoriasis. Itching, also referred to by the medical term ‘pruritus’, can be a problem for people with psoriasis. In fact, the word ‘psoriasis’ comes from the Greek ‘psor’, which means ‘of itching’.

Ideas to reduce itching

  • Skin is often itchy because it is dry, and so keeping the skin wellmoisturizedis important. One way to combat itch is by using a moisturizer frequently – carry a small amount with you throughout the day.
  • Water and soap dry out the skin, therefore it is very important to moisturise after a bath or shower.
  • Avoid irritants such as soaps, bubble bath, detergents and any fabrics that seem to irritate. Cotton clothes are usually comfortable for people with skin conditions, and certain emollients can be used as soap substitutes.
  • Some mildsteroid creams and ointmentshave anti-itch properties – these are available from a pharmacist, or on prescription from your Prescriber. Similarly, some moisturizers have anti-itch properties; look out for ‘lauromacrogols’ (an ingredient with similar properties to a local anaesthetic, which helps to relieve and soothe itchy skin) in the list of ingredients.
  • There are a number of anti-itch creams available over-the-counter, and some people find that topical applications containing Capsaicin (an ingredient derived from hot peppers) can relieve itching.
  • Regarding Anti-Histamines, it is advisable to speak to the pharmacist or your doctor regarding anti-histamine tablets as some can cause drowsiness or may interact with other medicines you are taking. This can be useful if itching is a problem at night time as the anti-histamine can be taken before bedtime, and can help people sleep through their itching. There are non-drowsy antihistamines also which can be used if itching is bothersome in the daytime.
  • Keep nails short to limit any damage done to the skin by scratching. Try not to scratch if at all possible. It is thought that scratching can make itch worse and an ‘itch - scratch’ cycle may develop with regular scratching. (That is, you itch more because you scratch, so you scratch more because you itch more, and so on). Picking at plaques can also make psoriasis worse, increase itching and discomfort and encourage infection – try not to pick if at all possible.
  • Try to keep cool. You could try having a cool shower, or apply cold, wet towels to the area that is causing the itch. Keeping emollients or moisturisers in the fridge can also create a cooling, soothing effect.

Skin Barrier Function: The Key to Healthy Skin

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Skin Barrier Function: The Key to Healthy Skin

Restoring your “skin barrier” is the skincare buzzword right now – and it’s actually for good reason! As much as we love our high-efficacy actives like glycolic acid and retinol, our core skincare philosophy is always first to have your skin barrier care down pat before diving into the other more glamorous skin concerns.

WHAT IS “BARRIER FUNCTION”?

As the name suggests, one of the most important jobs your skin has is keeping water in and the bad guys out (i.e., pathogens, damaging UV rays, pollutants, allergens, etc.).

Your entire skin is constantly turning over and shedding, which means it’s transforming all the way from the base up to the SC(stratum corneum).

When the cells reach the SC, they become flattened, dead cells meant to serve and protect. The SC is mostly fatty – forming a lipid matrix with a blend of ceramides, cholesterols, and fatty acids to seal water in.

The deep layers of skin are full of water, but the water exists on a gradient, slowly diminishing until you drop down to ~10% to 30% composition in the fatty SC. And there’s still more! Above the SC are lots of microbes forming our microbiome.

The diversity of microbes(flora) also contributes to the general protection of our skin barrier.

So what happens when your skin barrier’s not up to par? A weakened or compromised skin barrier often shows up in the form of excessive dryness, sensitivity, irritation, and/or inflammation. Oftentimes, these symptoms also further weaken your skin barrier throwing everything off into a vicious cycle of “nope!”

Water components are only half of the puzzle, we also should take a look at your natural skin lipid content. Skin lipids are comprised of ceramides, cholesterol, and fatty acids. As we age, the amount of skin lipids you have drastically decreases, and this is also found in those with certain skin conditions such as eczema and atopic dermatitis.

TAKEAWAY

To sum up, you’re probably already doing a lot of the right things to take care of your skin barrier, so wanting to work on barrier care shouldn’t be something you’ll need to completely nuke your current routine for. So here’s a quick checklist of questions to ask yourself as your go through your moisturizing routine:

  • Do a cleanser check-in! How does your skin feel post-wash?
  • Consider using an antioxidant serum in the morning.
  • Do you have enough humectants in your moisturizer?
  • Does your moisturizer contain occlusives, ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterols?
  • See any niacinamide in your products? Great! Remember you only need 2-5%

Your Skincare routine : is it working

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Your Skincare routine : is it working

We often remind people that regardless of what you read on the interweb (yes! Even here), always remember to listen to your skin.

So how do you really know your skincare routine and the products you use working for you? And real talk… how long is it supposed to take for you to see results?

In today’s fast-paced world, everyone wants results instantly. While we preach patience when it comes to skincare, there are a handful of products you would know pretty much right away if they’re right for you:

Cleansers: you’re looking for something that will clean thoroughly without giving skin that “squeaky clean” feel. If you switch to a new cleanser, pay attention to any changes in dryness for a few days. If nothing significant changes, where you're experiencing excess dryness, stinging, or sensitivity, the cleanser is a go!

Sunscreens: I can write essays on the issues of sunscreen formulation. However, when it comes to choosing a sunscreen for your skin, there is one simple golden rule of thumb: texture is king. “Are you willing to slather this sunscreen on thick and re-apply?” That’s really the most important criterion when it comes to figuring out if the sunscreen’s the right fit for your skin.

Moisturizers: A good moisturizer right for your skin type will help you stay hydrated throughout the day. But it usually takes ~1-2 weeks to realize a really good moisturizer, where your skin doesn’t feel like it’s still lacking any moisture despite already applied and your skin barrier feels healthy enough to take on those active treatments.

Chemical exfoliants: Chemical exfoliants help smooth out skin texture and can even improve signs of fine lines and brighten dull skin. Give it a solid full skin cycle of ~1 month to see texture improvement to know you’re on the right track. It’ll actually take even longer to see those additional improvements with hyperpigmentation and fine lines and wrinkles.

Try to pay attention to cues and signals your skin’s sending you and remember that consistency and patience pay off when it comes to your top skin concerns.


Bakuchiol: A "retinol alternative” ?

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

2 min read

 Bakuchiol: A "retinol alternative” ?

Good old anti-aging retinol promises so many benefits. Yet for many, it’s a temperamental little guy that can wreak havoc on your carefully maintained skin barrier. This means there are always new, buzzy ingredients promising the same glitz and glam of retinol without the snake molting, angry skin onboarding phase.

One of the hottest ingredients in this category is bakuchiol, often marketed as a “plant-based retinol alternative”.

THE SCIENCE BEHIND BAKUCHIOL

Bakuchiol was first isolated and identified from the traditional Chinese/Indian medicine plant babchi all the way back in the 60s. Fast forward to the early 2000s, bakuchiol had accumulated quite a testing profile, with in vitro studies showing that this molecule may have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory benefits. Then finally in 2014, a study using substitute skin showed that bakuchiol seemed to have similar gene expression as retinol

Your QUESTIONS answered …

1. Does it work?

The data shows that if used twice a day for 12 weeks, it can help reduce wrinkles and help reduce pigmentation.

2. Does it help with acne?

It seems that bakuchiol could help as a secondary active to adapalene and salicylic acid in reducing breakouts. Not recommended bakuchiol as a main or singular active to treat acne.

3. How irritating is it to the skin?

Referring to the study discussed above, despite using bakuchiol twice a day vs. retinol once a day, bakuchiol users had significantly less irritation. However, users still experienced redness. So while better than retinol, not completely free of irritation potential.

4. How similar is it to retinol?

We wouldn’t say bakuchiol is even a cousin to retinol or the other retinoids. It’s simply an extract that might possibly interact with the retinoid receptor in the skin, but like all mechanism studies, this just isn’t that well understood. Hence we consider bakuchiol a retinoid alternative but not a retinoid.

5. Is it similar to retinol for pregnant women?

We don’t know...yet. Again, this is a better conversation to have with your doctor if you are considering bakuchiol

6. Can one use retinol with bakuchiol ?

Yes…carefully!. Like all new products, patch test & take it slow to make sure the skin is happy with the combination.

7. What is the target concentration?

Aim for 0.5% but we’ve had trouble finding this concentration. It’s either at a mysterious amount or way too high.

8. Do you need sunscreen?

To be honest, it hasn’t been well studied. Good sunscreen practices are always important anyway so no matter what, just keep that up!

KEY BAKUCHIOL TAKEAWAYS

  • Bakuchiol used at 0.5% twice daily performed similarly to 0.5% retinol once daily for wrinkle reduction and reducing hyperpigmentation.
  • It pairs well with your other acne actives such as adapalene and salicylic acid!
  • Still proceed caution - though generally speaking gentler than retinol, it’s far from being a side effects-free vanilla ingredient that some brands would like you to believe.

Plucking Grey Hair ....

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Plucking Grey Hair ....

Before we get into the rules on plucking, let us understand what causes gray hair

Gray hair results from a reduction in melanin in the hair which occurs as we age. The truth is, once your graying process begins, there is no way to stop the grays from coming in for good
• Plucking those occasional gray hair will not trigger a proliferation of more grays.
Each hair follicle has its own melanin production, which determines its color.
Graying is primarily influenced by genetics and aging.
• Other causes include vitamin deficiencies and even some genetic syndromes!


So, feel free to pluck those gray strands if you prefer, but remember to do so gently to avoid hair and scalp damage.
But, while the myth that if you pluck one gray hair ten of its siblings will pop up in its place has been dispelled, you still may want to refrain from plucking.

In addition to swelling and scarring, plucking hair straight from the root could also contribute to irreversible premature hair loss in that area.

Embrace your unique journey with grace, whether you choose to flaunt your grays or not!


Aloe Vera-it is good for skin

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Aloe Vera-it is good for skin

Aloe stimulates fibroblast which produces the collagen and elastin fibers making the skin more elastic and less wrinkled. It also has cohesive effects on the superficial flaking epidermal cells by sticking them together, which softens the skin.

Vitamins: Antioxidant Vitamin- A, C, and E,B12, folic acid and choline

Enzymes: Aloe vera has got 8 enzymes in its toolkit like Brady kinase which eases inflammation

Minerals: Calcium, chromium, copper and other antioxidants.

Sugars: Monosaccharides and polysaccharides function as humectants

Fatty Acids: Like cholesterol have some anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties

Others: Aloe Vera contributes 20 of the 22 human-required amino acids and 7 of 8 essentials. It also contains salicylic acid!

BUT REMEMBER:

Embrace Aloe Vera with Caution

Patch Test: Prioritize a patch test to avoid unexpected reactions.

Pure Power: Opt for pure Aloe Vera gel or high-content products.

Sensitivity Alert: If allergies or sensitivities are your companions, consulta dermatologist.

Disclaimer:Thisdoesnotconstitutediagnosis,treatmentormedicaladvice.This is for informational purposes only and should not be considered a substitute for a consultation.


Elder Skin care in Hospital

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Elder Skin care in Hospital

Skin thins with age and can become very weak. Older skin may injure easily and take longer to heal.
● During a stay in hospital, your skin may be affected by staying in bed or sitting in one position for too long, whether you are eating and drinking enough and your physical condition.
● To avoid pressure sores, make sure you move regularly and check your skin.
● Pressure sores and skin tears are very painful and can take a long time to heal.
Pressure sores and skin tears are very painful and can take a long time to heal. They can cause other, sometimes severe, problems such as infections or permanent muscle or bone loss.


There are some things that you can do to look after your skin, including:
● Keep your skin clean and dry.
● Avoid any products that dry out your skin. This includes many soaps, body washes and talcum powder. Ask for skin cleansers that are non-drying. Ask nursing staff or your pharmacist to give you options.
● Use a water-based moisturizer daily. Be careful of bony areas and don’t rub or massage them. Ask staff for help if you need it.

Check your skin every day or ask for help if you are concerned. Let a doctor or nurse know if there are any changes in your skin, especially redness, swelling or soreness.
● If you are at risk of pressure sores, a nurse will change your position often, including during the night.
● Always use any devices given to you to protect your skin from tearing and pressure sores. These may include protective mattresses, seat cushions, heel wedges and limb protectors.
● Drink plenty of water (unless the doctor has told you not to.
● Eat regular main meals and snacks. Sit out of bed to eat if you can.


Say Good By to these

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

 Say Good By to these

Say goodbye to these products that are not doing your skin any favor:


Makeup wipes: Stop the harsh tug-and-pull routine! These wipes may seem convenient, but they still leave traces of makeup on your face. Opt for a cleansing oil, cleansing balm or micellar water instead!

Onion shampoo: It's time to bid farewell to this odorous hair product! While onion is known for its nutritional benefits, using it directly on your scalp might not be the best idea. The pungent smell lingers, and it may not provide the desired results. Also your shampoo doesn't stay on your hair long enough to help with hair fall much!



Bio oil: Bio-Oil may not be as effective as it claims to be, and may even clog pores and cause breakouts in some people. Additionally, the retinoid derivative it contains is too weak to have any significant effect on stretch marks.

Come on everyone, make some space for healthier choices and throw away products you don't need


Glutathione: The latest buzz

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Glutathione: The latest buzz

Glutathione is involved in tissue building and repair, making chemicals and proteins needed in the body and in immune system function. People take glutathione for aging, alcohol use disorder, liver disease, heart disease, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific
evidence to support these uses.

Some facts worth knowing about Glutathione Let's go-
1. Did you know? Glutathione, a natural antioxidant in our body, takes on free radicals like a superhero.
It even plays a role in skin lightening by shifting melanin gears.


2. The data isn't quite locked in on whether it's the ultimate skin savior or just a hype train. The right dose is like a mystery novel we're still reading and researching.
3. Glutathione's side effects might include allergies, tummy rumbles, and different responses from everyone.
4. Turns out, the spotlight might be shared with vitamin C and other pals in the mix.

Glutathione supplements should be avoided during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
You are perfect just the way you are. You don’t need to alter your skin or body as per others' norm.


Choosing the right vitamin C serum

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Choosing the right vitamin C serum

The antioxidants in vitamin C may help defend against the damage that UV light can cause that doesn’t mean that you can use a vitamin C skin serum in place of sunscreen. It can’t replace SPF since it doesn’t absorb UVA or UVB rays. But if UV light does get into your skin, some research suggests that vitamin C can help blunt the harm.

Choosing the right vitamin C serum can be a real head-scratcher. But fear not, l've got you covered with a simple guide tailored to your skin type and concerns!

Oily/Acne prone skin:

First, treat your acne. Do not apply to active acne!

•Look for watery serum formulations with derivatives like ascorbyl-phosphate or ascorbyl-glucoside.

Recommendations: vaunt vitamin-C water ,ordinary ascorbyl-glucoside

Combination skin

You can look for serum based ones but always choose the right derivative!

•L'-Ascorbic acid, ascorbyl-glucoside or phosphate!'

Recommendations: Cosrx c23, VCX, Revibra c10

Dry skin :Oil based formulations or Vitamin-C based Moisturizers

Recommendations: Nykaa skinrx, Klairs vit C

Mature skin:

You want something that's combined with Vit C for a potent cocktail!

Recommendations:MuradvitACglycolic-thishasglycolicadditionallytoresurface and brighten!

These recommendations are based on personal experience and upon decoding the formulation.


Understanding Hair Loss And Thinning

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Understanding Hair Loss And Thinning

Hair loss and hair thinning are common problems that can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, aging, stress, and diet. External factors such as styling and chemical treatments can also contribute to hair loss.

Oxidative stress is a newer factor that has been linked to excessive hair loss. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants in the body. Free radicals are unstable molecules that can damage cells, including hair follicles. Antioxidants help to neutralize free radicals and protect cells from damage.

There are two main phases of the hair growth cycle: anagen (growth) and telogen (resting). The anagen phase is the longest phase and determines how long your hair can grow. The telogen phase is the shortest phase and is followed by the shedding of the hair.

There are two main drug treatments for hair loss: DHT blockers and minoxidil. DHT blockers work by preventing the conversion of testosterone to DHT, a hormone that can damage hair follicles. Minoxidil works by stimulating the growth of hair follicles.

In addition to drugs, there are a number of lifestyle changes that can help to prevent and treat hair loss. These include reducing stress, eating a healthy diet, and avoiding excessive styling and chemical treatments.

Here are some additional key points from the text:

  • The scalp condition can affect hair quality.
  • Oxidative stress can lead to premature hair loss and excessive hair loss.
  • There are four main phases in the hair growth cycle.
  • DHT blockers and minoxidil are two common drug treatments for hair loss.
  • There are a number of lifestyle changes that can help to prevent and treat hair



Tranexamic acid: THE ANTI-PIGMENTATION WARRIOR INGREDIENT

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Tranexamic acid: THE ANTI-PIGMENTATION WARRIOR INGREDIENT

Tranexamic acid

Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic agent that has been used for decades to prevent bleeding. However, recent research has shown that it is also a powerful ingredient for skin brightening.

Tranexamic acid works by blocking the production of melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. It also has anti-inflammatory properties, which can help to reduce the redness and irritation that often accompanies hyperpigmentation.

As a result, tranexamic acid can be an effective treatment for a variety of skin discolourations, including melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, and age spots. It can also be used to brighten the skin overall and give it a more radiant appearance.

Tranexamic acid can be used in both the morning and evening, after cleansing the face. It can be used in conjunction with other skincare ingredients, such as retinoids and antioxidants. However, it is important to start with a low concentration and gradually increase the dosage as tolerated.

Some people may experience side effects from using tranexamic acid, such as irritation, dryness, and flaky skin. If you have sensitive skin, it is important to patch test the product before using it on your entire face.

Overall, tranexamic acid is a safe and effective ingredient for skin brightening. It is a great addition to any skincare routine that is looking to target dark spots and improve overall complexion.

Here are some additional tips for using tranexamic acid:

  • Start by using tranexamic acid once a day and gradually increase to twice a day as tolerated.
  • Apply tranexamic acid to a clean, dry face.
  • Use a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day, even if you are using tranexamic acid in the evening.
  • If you experience any side effects, stop using tranexamic acid and consult with a dermatologist.

If you are looking for a natural and effective way to brighten your skin, tranexamic acid is a great option. It is a safe and well-tolerated ingredient that can be used in conjunction with other skincare ingredients. With consistent use, you can see a noticeable improvement in the appearance of your skin.


Effective strategy for hyperpigmentation

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Effective strategy for hyperpigmentation

Tyrosinase

Tyrosinase is an enzyme that is responsible for the production of melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. Too much melanin can lead to dark spots, hyperpigmentation, and other skin problems. Tyrosinase inhibitors are natural compounds that can block the activity of tyrosinase, helping to lighten skin and reduce the appearance of dark spots.

Some of the most effective tyrosinase inhibitors include:

  • Alpha arbutin: A naturally occurring compound that is found in plants such as bearberry, cranberry, and blueberry. It works by blocking the production of melanin at the early stages of the process.
  • Kojic acid: A compound that is produced by a fungus called Aspergillus oryzae. It works by blocking the oxidation of tyrosine, a precursor to melanin.
  • Licorice extract: A natural compound that contains a compound called glycyrrhizin, which blocks the activity of tyrosinase.

These compounds can be found in over-the-counter creams and serums. When choosing a tyrosinase inhibitor product, it is important to look for one that contains a high concentration of the active ingredient. It is also important to use the product consistently for several weeks to see results.

In addition to using a tyrosinase inhibitor product, there are a few other things you can do to lighten skin and reduce the appearance of dark spots:

  • Apply the product to clean, dry skin.
  • Use the product twice a day, morning and evening.
  • Be patient. It may take several weeks to see results.
  • Wear sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day, even when you are indoors.
  • Avoid sun exposure, especially during the middle of the day.

If you are considering using a tyrosinase inhibitor product, it is important to talk to your doctor first. Tyrosinase inhibitors can interact with certain medications, so it is important to make sure that they are safe for you to use.

Here are some additional information about tyrosinase inhibition:

  • Tyrosinase inhibitors work by blocking the production of melanin at the early stages of the process. This prevents the formation of dark spots and hyperpigmentation.
  • Tyrosinase inhibitors are generally safe and well-tolerated by most people. However, some people may experience side effects such as redness, irritation, and dryness.
  • It is important to use tyrosinase inhibitors consistently for several weeks to see results. It may take up to 12 weeks to see the full effects of the treatment.
  • Tyrosinase inhibitors can be used in conjunction with other treatments for dark spots, such as laser therapy and chemical peels.

If you are interested in using tyrosinase inhibitors to lighten your skin, it is important to talk to your doctor first. They can help you choose the right product for your skin type and concerns.


Don't Skip SPF If Using Hyperpigmentation Products

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Don't  Skip SPF If Using Hyperpigmentation Products

Sunscreen use is a crucial part of treatment for photosensitive diseases like melasma and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), which are made worse by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays and visible light. One of the challenges in treating pigmentary disorders is the lack of education regarding sun protection and noncompliance with photoprotection. It's important to understand the role of melanin when it comes to hyperpigmentation products, which work by lightening the skin.

Most of these skin lightening ingredients work by inhibiting tyrosinase which catalyzes the first two steps of melanin production. If we have a reduction of melanin synthesis due to inhibition of tyrosinase, we have a reduction in the photo protection our skin naturally provides.

This means more of a chance of sunburn if you don't wear SPF, and side effects of sunburn can surely mean more hyperpigmentation!

Tyrosinase:

The key enzyme responsible for melanin production > Melanin plays a key role in photo-protection> Less melanin production = lower ability of melanin to reduce UV radiation transmission> More UV ray transmission = Higher chance of burning, which can ultimately cause MORE hyperpigmentation!

In short, if you use products to assist with hyperpigmentation, you have MORE of a reason to wear SPF (on top of every other reason).

For many patients, especially those with skin of color, disorders of hyperpigmentation, such as melasma and PIH, have a substantial negative influence on self-esteem and quality of life.

Patients frequently describe feeling embarrassed and self-conscious, which makes them avoid social situations and alters their dress choices, resulting in a general lack of mental well-being.


Sunscreen application: Expectation vs Reality

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Sunscreen application: Expectation vs Reality

At the start of the 1990s most commercially available sunscreen products had SPFs less than 10. By the 2000s most manufacturers produced sunscreens with SPFS of 15–30. Nowadays, there is no shortage of sunscreen products with an SPF of 50 or higher.

Why SPF matters:

The popular interpretation of SPF (short for sun protection factor) is that is describes how much longer skin covered with sunscreen takes to burn compared with unprotected skin.

A more appropriate definition is that SPF is the ratio of the least amount of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) required to produce a minimal erythema (redness) on sunscreen protected skin to the amount of energy required to produce the same erythema on unprotected skin. For example, an SPF 30 sunscreen (applied adequately) will allow your skin to handle 30 times more UVR before burning.

Because the amount of UVR is not constant during the day, the SPF doesn’t tell you how much longer you can stay in the sun without burning with the sunscreen on. However, it DOES provide information on protection offered by different sunscreens. For example, an SPF 15 sunscreen will let in twice as much UVR as an SPF 30 sunscreen, provided you apply the same amount.

While the expectation is that sunscreens will deliver the labeled SPF, many studies have shown a mismatch between the expected protection achieved by sunscreens and that observed in practice. This discrepancy depends on upon a number of factors: application thickness and technique; type of sunscreen applied; resistance to water immersion and sand abrasion; and if the sunscreen is re-applied, among others.


The Science of Hair Products : Shampoo

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

The Science of Hair Products : Shampoo

Sulfates, fatty alcohols, silicones, preservatives… what are they doing in your shampoo and conditioner, and do you need to avoid them?

Today’s post is a deep dive into some of the key ingredients in haircare products.

Shampoo obviously cleans your hair and scalp. Just like skin, your scalp produces sebum, which we usually think of as oil. It keeps your skin and scalp nice and soft, and also travels along the hair to keep that soft too.

But sometimes we have too much oil (some of us (me) more than others), and it also tends to stick to other things like dirt, dust, skin flakes and pollution. You might also use styling products that need to be washed off.

So to make them mix, we use a shampoo, and the key cleaning ingredients in shampoos are surfactants.

WHAT ARE SURFACTANTS?

Surfactants are really useful ingredients because they have a head that likes water, and a tail that likes oil.So instead of repelling each other, surfactants allow the oil to basically be smuggled into the water in lots of tiny droplets, and get washed away down the drain.

Sulfate surfactants are a diverse group of ingredients that behave in different ways. And on top of that they can be combined in formulas in lots of different ways to give very different shampoos.


Sunscreen realities

V.Tejaswini

V.Tejaswini

1 min read

Sunscreen realities

☑️ Sunscreens are NOT complete sunblocks. These does NOT filter UVR 100%.

☑️ The amount of protection sunscreens ultimately provide is very user-dependent. This requires applying the recommended amount (2 mg/cm2) in a smooth, continuous, even layer and re-application to ensure the protection in the label is achieved and sustained. This is not always achievable in the real world.

☑️ Because of these limitations, it MUST be remembered that sunscreen is just one element of a strategy aimed at controlling sun exposure.

☑️ Avoiding sun exposure when possible, seeking shade around the middle of the day, using wide-brimmed hats and sunglasses, and wearing sun protection clothing (UPF) are very important. These are not emphasized as much as sunscreen as sun protection measures but these may even be more effective than sunscreen because you do not need to remember to use (and how to apply them correctly) or to reapply them, and these don’t wear off!

Sunscreen tips and tricks

☑️ The usual requirements apply:

  • Broad spectrum
  • SPF 30 and above
  • Water resistant
  • Wearable texture
  • Suitable to your skin type and budget
  • The best sunscreen is the one you will keep wearing!

☑️ Inorganic (physical) filters are better for sensitive skin, and organic (chemical) filters provide better textures and are more cosmetically pleasing (easier to spread, no white cast). These filters can also be combined to increase the overall protection of a sunscreen. Generally speaking, a higher total concentration of sunscreen filters (that are photostable together) will also provide a higher protection.

☑️ Sunscreen filters are not the only ingredients that determine the SPF of a sunscreen product, Inactive ingredients and overall formulation contribute too.

☑️ Countries regulate sunscreen differently. Some sunscreen filters are available in select countries only. Getting sunscreens from countries that are stringent with sunscreen regulation would be helpful.

☑️ Generally speaking, going with large, reputable, multinational brands who know their sunscreens well and have years of experience formulating them are also helpful.

Closing Thoughts:

Evaluate your sunscreen. Is it doing its job? Are you still getting sunburnt? Are your pigmentations getting worse? Are you not happy with how it looks or how it feels? If you feel it’s not delivering for you, change sunscreens. There are so many great ones!